Gerrit Frohne-Brinkmann, Dirty Parrots, 2018.
Courtesy Galerie Noah Klink, the artist.
Photo: Volker Renner
Gerrit Frohne-Brinkmann, Dirty Parrots, 2018.
Courtesy Galerie Noah Klink, the artist.
Photo: Volker Renner
Gerrit Frohne-Brinkmann designs a fictional, prehistoric underwater landscape for a publicly accessible underground location. The work draws attention to a period that surpasses our civilization and “infiltrates” a non-human perspective into urban space: Animals have lived there long before humans populated the scene and they will continue living there long after we have disappeared again. The artist specifically conceives a spatial installation for the KPTN underground car park underneath the Astor Filmlounge. Its elements are reminiscent of theatre backdrops and depict his version of a flora and fauna set 550 - 460 million years ago.
This utopia of an idealised community manages without man; its protagonists are plants, sponges, worms, cephalopods and snails.

Frohne-Brinkmann works from pseudo-scientific depictions created by the Czech draftsman Zdeněk Burian. Burian's illustrated images are based on historical findings but ultimately utilise his own fantasies in order to bring the underwater landscapes to life. Frohne-Brinkmann transfers the modest drawings into extensive sculptures by enlarging particular sections, which are then airbrushed onto metallic partition walls.

The objects draw on the aesthetics of fairground stalls and deliberately evoke theatre backdrops, yet without ever meeting these expectations. The individual elements of this series of work will be installed in several parking lots and remain for the duration of a year, allowing hotel guests and moviegoers to spontaneously engage with each piece. At the same
time, the installation can also be visited by professional audience and interested inhabitants with intended view.

The installation plays with the maritime genre (as it is frequently showcased in HafenCity) and blurs notions of the past, the future and the illusion of history and reality, suggesting through the work that an unpeopled world is potentially a better option. This conscious change of multiple forms of perspective (offshore, off cultivated places, off mankind) and experimentation with a non-functional space charged with narrative and imagination focuses on aspects of neglect.

Gerrit Frohne-Brinkmann (* 1990 in Friesoythe) studied Fine Arts at the University for Fine Arts Hamburg. In his installations, objects, performances and films he looks for the intersection between early cultural forms and current popular performances in the entertainment industry. From a fictionalised historical distance he describes the present and our relation to it, causing even the most obvious certainties to suddenly appear fragile and
brittle.

Most recently, his works were presented at the Dortmunder Kunstverein, the Kölnischer Kunstverein, the Kunsthalle Bremerhaven (all 2018), and at the Kestner Gesellschaft in Hanover (2017). In 2016, he won the Art Cologne Award for New Positions; in 2017, he was awarded the Follow Fluxus Scholarship by the Nassauischer Kunstverein in Wiesbaden.

The artist and the curator would like to thank the Hamburgische Kulturstiftung for their support.